In Response

In response to:

“This isn’t about us being selfish, keeping him alive because we can’t bear to let him go. It’s because if we did not fight for this chance, we will have to live with the ‘what if’ for ever”…

The above quote from Charlie Gard’s parents really got me wondering. After all, it’s very important we never discard anything said, and especially if it’s handed to us on a plate. The important point is whether or not these words have been suggested to them, or come via solicitors, doctors (in America) or whoever. If they’re original thoughts from Charlie’s parents then we cannot discount something said, whether it’s a negation or not, as being the motivation. In other words, when we have the courage to face the truth, we will see our motivations are always selfishly motivated. There is no wrong or right about this; it just is. It’s part of the human condition, and one of the reason we’re the ‘warriors,’ that Charlie’s parents described him as.

Without selfishness we’d never have made it this far. I think we should all take a step back, and understand the pain parents of terminally ill children, go through. We’re then able to objectively see the simple truth: none of want to see a child die and will selfishly keep them alive at all costs. Once again there is no wrong or right.

“What we do seem to struggle with, is seeing clearly, what the best interest of the child are. The child cannot speak for itself, it can only look beautiful and needy. This is translated by the parents into a powerful emotional bond, that even the reality of terminal illness, will struggle to break.”

We, as a society, have, over time, become increasingly dependent on government, and the people that work for it. Any form of dependence weakens us to the point of being unable to make important decisions for ourselves. When young, and driven by our emotions, (heart over head) we’re unlikely to make decisions that are either rational or based on the wellbeing of someone else, especially a needy and beautiful child. Although needy and beautiful Charlie Gard was a very poorly child, and for all we know, his suffering could have been off any scale we could possibly judge. The ‘what if’ needed to be: what if this child is suffering intolerably? If there’s any question of this, we mustn’t prolong life. None of us ever ‘save’ lives we only ever prolong them.

So when we choose to leave important decision to government, because we’re so weakened by dependence, it proves hard to suddenly, and selfishly decide, we want to change the rules to prolong a child’s life. If we want others to look after us, that’s exactly what they’ll do; the selfish motivation in this instant, is power. The dependent are powerless at the hands of government and those who work for them.

We take back our power from government when we take out the confusion. Protecting the rights of a child can never necessarily mean keeping them alive at all costs. It’s probably an overused cliché, however, we never allow an animal to suffer unnecessarily, so why would we a child? Because we think human life is more important than that of an animal? Or is it because we love them enough to let them go?

Reading that Charlie’s parents will now “let our beautiful little boy be with the angels” only goes to prove how far we’ve yet to travel, when it comes to loving our children. Absurd Magical Beliefs (AMB’s) have no place in child-rearing if we have any chance of making it further. It’s this kind of thinking that  keeps us dependent on others (in this case doctors) who’ve been awarded power over us, and will continue to make decisions, on our behalf. 

“Finally, it’s been suggested, the American doctor who offered to help, had a vested interest in the company that manufactured the drugs, that would have supposedly prolong Charlie’s life.”

Once again we can see none of us are free from selfish motivations. The trick, is to change our understandings of the word selfish. When we have little consideration for the needs of other, we’re being self-centered, which is the reality of many people in the case of Charlie Gard. When we’re selfish we can very easily selfishly put the needs of others before our own, because this is a pleasurable thing to consider. Believe it or not, we can feel pleasure, when one of our own, is released from suffering.