When Poison is The Weapon of Choice

“We know the vast majority of people reading this blog are law abiding, loving citizens, and so the following thought experiment, is highly speculative and hypothetical”

Let’s say you wanted someone dead. That’s right, your mind is made up, and the only resolution to the issue is murder.

Oh yes, the ‘red mist’ has descended, and in our private thoughts we harbour murderous intentions. Thankfully these kind of thoughts rarely take the step from fantasy to reality. They’re usually very fleeting; not sustained enough to cause us, or the recipient of our thoughts, any harm at all.

So, hypothetically speaking, let’s say, on this occasion, the red mist hasn’t dissipated, and you’ve decided on murder. After some further thought you’ve also decided on the means: Poison. Yes indeed, poison is the weapon of choice.

There are many, many ways to take a life; dozens of ways we can inflict harm on another human being, and yet, poison has been chosen. Before we actually carry out our murderous intentions though, let’s just take a moment to examine exactly why this method.

It could simply be down to convenience, ease of use, or, as is most likely, it’s the delay before it takes effect that’s important. This time delay gives you, the perpetrator, time to escape after the trap has been laid. A bomb with a time delay would have the same effect, but this of course, would be extremely indiscriminate. Okay, if you’re a terrorist with indiscriminate killing, in mind. Our intention though, is to just kill one or two people.

“Also, let’s think about the nature of poison, and how it does its job. Once administered, what exactly are we thinking, and what does this say about us?”

In other words, what is the psychology, behind our choice of weapon? Everything we say and do to others is a clear indication of our true nature. If we stuck a knife in someone, for example, it’s potentially our anger that’s driven such a violent act. We’re more likely to be young and angry when using a knife.

The use of poison would suggest a more scheming, calmer, use of planning. Sure, anger may be at the seat of the driving, and yet we’re not so clouded by it, that we blindly lash out. We’re planning and scheming. We don’t want to get found out. We don’t want the weapon to be traced back to us in any way. Or if we do, it’s deliberate, and doubt can be cast on whether its origin, can really be authenticated.

“Perhaps we want to instil doubt and fear at the same time. The long game may be our intention. Disruption, of entire countries, might be our long term goal. We understand how to divide and conquer”

All things said, calculated acts of murder, are committed by those whose brains are unable to see peaceful paths. Revenge is driven by an inability to control emotions. We’re stuck with angry feelings that we believe can only be resolved through re-inflicting the hurt and harm we feel we’ve suffered.

When our power and control is threatened we commit murder. If someone is seen to have sold us out, so to speak, we must seek revenge or lose face. Those who give our secrets away are seen as traitors who must be destroyed. History is full of people who’ve been murdered simply because they’ve told the truth; revealed secrets. The secrets we all have. The lies we all hide behind.

“Words can be used as poison”

There are numerous cases of domestic abuse, where someone has taken their own life, as a result of being ground down, through years of verbal abuse from a partner. Tell someone they’re worthless, useless or hopeless for long enough, and eventually, they’ll believe it. Imagine the damage words of this nature do to the self-esteem of children. Either directly or when in earshot of parents arguing.

Poison has to be the most cruel and calculating way anyone can take another’s life. Those who use poison, be it through words or chemicals, are the worst kind of human. The worst kind, because this poison, is only an extension of what already exist within themselves: Hatred, cowardice and fear. Frightened, scheming cowards, use poison. We must be very wary.  Wary and aware of what does not exist within the mind of the poisoner too.

In Response

In response to:

https://wordpress.com/read/feeds/55803779/posts/1537341987

“This isn’t about us being selfish, keeping him alive because we can’t bear to let him go. It’s because if we did not fight for this chance, we will have to live with the ‘what if’ for ever”…

The above quote from Charlie Gard’s parents really got me wondering. After all, it’s very important we never discard anything said, and especially if it’s handed to us on a plate. The important point is whether or not these words have been suggested to them, or come via solicitors, doctors (in America) or whoever. If they’re original thoughts from Charlie’s parents then we cannot discount something said, whether it’s a negation or not, as being the motivation. In other words, when we have the courage to face the truth, we will see our motivations are always selfishly motivated. There is no wrong or right about this; it just is. It’s part of the human condition, and one of the reason we’re the ‘warriors,’ that Charlie’s parents described him as.

Without selfishness we’d never have made it this far. I think we should all take a step back, and understand the pain parents of terminally ill children, go through. We’re then able to objectively see the simple truth: none of want to see a child die and will selfishly keep them alive at all costs. Once again there is no wrong or right.

“What we do seem to struggle with, is seeing clearly, what the best interest of the child are. The child cannot speak for itself, it can only look beautiful and needy. This is translated by the parents into a powerful emotional bond, that even the reality of terminal illness, will struggle to break.”

We, as a society, have, over time, become increasingly dependent on government, and the people that work for it. Any form of dependence weakens us to the point of being unable to make important decisions for ourselves. When young, and driven by our emotions, (heart over head) we’re unlikely to make decisions that are either rational or based on the wellbeing of someone else, especially a needy and beautiful child. Although needy and beautiful Charlie Gard was a very poorly child, and for all we know, his suffering could have been off any scale we could possibly judge. The ‘what if’ needed to be: what if this child is suffering intolerably? If there’s any question of this, we mustn’t prolong life. None of us ever ‘save’ lives we only ever prolong them.

So when we choose to leave important decision to government, because we’re so weakened by dependence, it proves hard to suddenly, and selfishly decide, we want to change the rules to prolong a child’s life. If we want others to look after us, that’s exactly what they’ll do; the selfish motivation in this instant, is power. The dependent are powerless at the hands of government and those who work for them.

We take back our power from government when we take out the confusion. Protecting the rights of a child can never necessarily mean keeping them alive at all costs. It’s probably an overused cliché, however, we never allow an animal to suffer unnecessarily, so why would we a child? Because we think human life is more important than that of an animal? Or is it because we love them enough to let them go?

Reading that Charlie’s parents will now “let our beautiful little boy be with the angels” only goes to prove how far we’ve yet to travel, when it comes to loving our children. Absurd Magical Beliefs (AMB’s) have no place in child-rearing if we have any chance of making it further. It’s this kind of thinking that  keeps us dependent on others (in this case doctors) who’ve been awarded power over us, and will continue to make decisions, on our behalf. 

“Finally, it’s been suggested, the American doctor who offered to help, had a vested interest in the company that manufactured the drugs, that would have supposedly prolong Charlie’s life.”

Once again we can see none of us are free from selfish motivations. The trick, is to change our understandings of the word selfish. When we have little consideration for the needs of other, we’re being self-centered, which is the reality of many people in the case of Charlie Gard. When we’re selfish we can very easily selfishly put the needs of others before our own, because this is a pleasurable thing to consider. Believe it or not, we can feel pleasure, when one of our own, is released from suffering.  

stopconfusion
Please

Thoughts, Words and Worlds

World-Countries-Word-Cloud-800px
A World of Words

From the moment we’re born the world is introduced to us through words. From a midwife exclaiming “Oh look it’s a little hitler!” – purely because the child was born close to the date of hitler’s birthday – to a mother’s first words to her daughter: “you’re just so beautiful,” all these words, have influence over us to varying degrees, for the rest of our lives.

A word spoken can be very different to a word thought. Let’s take the example of the midwife calling a mothers newborn son a ‘little hitler.’ No doubt at the time: 1 am 21st April 1965, with the mother and midwife having lived through world war ll, it was potentially heard as a joke. If it had been left in that moment, then perhaps this would have held true, however, with the child’s mother repeating this ‘joke’ on every birthday over the years, the joke turned into something else. What effect, do you imagine, would there be to the individual described as a ‘little hitler’ on every birthday during his childhood? No effect, some effect or a cataclysmic effect?

You may think I’m being dramatic to describe a supposed joke, repeated every year, for many years, as having a cataclysmic effect, however, this would be to underestimate the power of words and language; one of the few things that attempts to separate us from the barbarism of nature.

“Consider the cumulative effect.”

As our ‘little hitler’ grows, begins to learn about war, and specifically the ideology and beliefs of hitler, understandings, both false and true, begin to formulate in his mind. Now, pause for a moment if you’re assuming I’m going to tell you all about a child who started to turn into a monster. In fact due to some very different words, also heard during his childhood, our ‘little hitler’ pursued a very different path indeed. He was drawn toward the priesthood. Cataclysmic to say the least, as being a priest – outside of any priesthood – is likely to be an indescribable pain to endure. Far better for the newborn boy to have simply been described as beautiful.

Now, you might be thinking: hold on, how does being labelled a little hitler link and connect to being drawn to the priesthood? To answer that question, all we need do, is understand that the part of the mind we’re dealing with, doesn’t communicate through logic. Consider dreams, how often do we wake from a dream thinking: ‘well that made perfect sense?’ And so, when we think of the potential for anger – at being associated with a monster purely through gender and birth date – this anger can have a provocative, reversed effect on the individual. Consider the often spoke about successes of individuals who’ve been told by teachers: “you’ll never amount to anything lad.”

And so, words, spoken out loud and heard in childhood, become our very thoughts and quite obviously continue to influence us in profound ways. Words and the process of our minds are intrinsically linked and connected. Feelings are expressed through words. Intentions are expressed through words. Our lives are expressed through words. Our beliefs and thoughts are expressed through words.

“That final truism is the domain of the GOLD Counsellor. When we take a thought or feeling, expressed in a word, and write it down, we then have a snapshot of that thought or feeling.”

Changing tack slightly for a moment, our use of language may grow as we get older, however, the feelings we’re describing, remain the same as the feelings first felt as a child. For example, we may write down the word: exuberant – to describe how we currently feel – and yet we may have described this feeling as ‘smiley’ when we were small. So even though we’ve used a ‘grown-up’ word in the present, the feeling associated was one we first felt many years ago.

Back on point. Pinpoint Analysis, takes these written words and identifies the very moment we first associated them with the feelings. In other words if we described ourself as a ‘happy person’ on paper, it’s possible – through the GOLD Counselling Methodology – for us to pinpoint the very moment we first learned this belief (thought).

More importantly, if there are times when we’d label ourselves in a negative light, let’s say ‘unkind’ and we were also encouraged to write this down, we could explore the very moment that feeling was linked in the mind to the word. We may well find that the feeling was driven by a childlike mentality, and this new understanding, would empower us to step away from such a limiting belief. Is it not the case that to be unkind is to be emotionally stunted? Are terrorists emotionally and mentally stunted?

So there we are: feelings become words become beliefs. We are bound to our thoughts and feelings linguistically; we are the words we use, as we are the beliefs we use language to describe – they are are one and the same. Understand where we first felt the feelings and we understand where we first learned the words that described them. The words we use describe both feelings and beliefs.

When raising children we must be very cautious in our use of language. The child who doesn’t wish to share his toys, or punches his classmates for that matter, is not unkind, he is simply emotionally immature.

“Without intervention the neglected, love starved child, remains emotionally stunted and immature all his life.”

Words

We emotionally stunt the child when we fail to explain the value in behaving in a different way. When we encourage children (through love) to share, and see the value in being gentle with each other – and then perpetually describe them as ‘kind’ – we have a better chance of raising children to become humankind, rather than what we’re currently seeing within the terrorist mind.

“Be assured: a terrorist’s hatred will have been seeded at a very early age and didn’t necessarily have anything to do with his current cause. Now they’re older they have simply found an outlet. That, is all there is to it, nothing more.”

There are those who would prefer we didn’t recognise this, as it once again – and rightfully so – increases and places the burden of responsibility, fairly and squarely on parenting. It emphasises the importance of love and emotional maturity within the worlds parents.